Latest from Crooks and Liars

  1. It Isn't Just The New York Times That Has Normalized Nazis
    It Isn't Just The New York Times That Has Normalized Nazis

    [Cross-posted at Orcinus.]

    All reporting is like a mirror: If it’s distorted or at an odd angle, it’s not a true picture, even if it tells us something. Reporting on the American extremist right, especially its darker and more toxic corners, is an especially difficult thing, as the New York Times recently discovered, because it’s so very hard to focus on a movement that deals in shadows.

    There’s a lesson in this not just for the Times, but for us all. Because sometimes even a half-reflection can tell us more about ourselves than we want to know.

    My first lesson in the intricacies of balancing reportage about neo-Nazis and crypto-fascists came in the late 1970s, when I was the then-21-year-old editor of a small-town daily in the Idaho Panhandle, about 20 miles north of the just-established rural compound of the Aryan Nations near Hayden Lake. After consultations with my reporters and the publisher, we came to the joint decision to avoid providing the new arrivals with anything other than cursory coverage: Attention, we reckoned, was what they wanted, and it seemed wise not to give it to them.

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  2. Lawrence O'Donnell: How Tax Cut Bill Will Be Used To Cut Medicare, Social Security

    On AM Joy, Joy Reid and Lawrence O'Donnell discussed how the supposedly deficit-hating Republicans have suddenly learned to love them.

    "They were looking for something like this, where can we squeeze in a tiny giveaway that goes to another income group, other than the rich," O'Donnell said.

    "So Rubio was the one who played that, he will now get credit for that. They know this is an explosion of the deficit. All of them do. Bob Corker is, I don't know how you want to characterize it, but you could call it the funniest of these votes. He actually said to Chuck Todd on Meet The Press, in the video that will live forever. 'I will not vote for a bill that increases the deficit by --'

    "One penny," Reid finished.

    "It's now a memorized line in politics. This increases the deficits by $1.5 trillion. And Corker knows that and his statement on voting for it, he makes no attempt to mitigate that. He doesn't say 'about that one penny.' He doesn't say a word."

    "It's very deliberate. It's a cycle. We've been in this cycle now, literally since 1993. It started in the 1980s. Bill Clinton gets elected. Having run on a middle class tax cut, which he did not do. he then enacted the biggest tax increase in history and I was there working in the Senate finance committee. Helped him do it. That was a completely partisan vote. The first big completely partisan vote.

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  3. Maddow Holds Master Class With Former U.S. Attorneys To Explain Mueller Probe
    Maddow Holds Master Class With Former U.S. Attorneys To Explain Mueller Probe

    Last night, the Rachel Maddow Show devoted the entire hour to examinations of the various legal angles of the Mueller investigation.

    Both fascinating and informative, it's well worth your time to watch the entire program. (Link to all segments here.)

    Won't here me say this often, but tonight's Rachel Maddow show is remarkable. Four former US Attorneys. McQuade, Fishman, Rosenberg and (I think) Nelson. This is really good stuff.

    — bmaz (@bmaz) December 16, 2017

    "You see, this is important stuff." - @maddow

    Absolutely! I hope the #TRMSLawSchool returns soon. We're half way through tonight's show and I have learned so much. I love TRMS Law School! #maddow

  4. Fox News Women Have Some Choice Words For Rupert Murdoch After He Dismissed Harassment Problems As ‘Nonsense’
    Fox News Women Have Some Choice Words For Rupert Murdoch After He Dismissed Harassment Problems As ‘Nonsense’

    Fox News women are reportedly “stunned, disgusted and ‘hungry for justice’” after Rupert Murdoch claimed that the only sexual harassment at the network were a few “isolated incidents” regarding Roger Ailes.

    From HuffPost:

    When Sky News’ Ian King asked Murdoch if he thought the accusations have hurt Fox, Murdoch, who is executive co-chairman of 21st Century Fox, responded: “It’s all nonsense.”

    Murdoch did say there was “sort of” a problem with former Fox News CEO Roger Ailes — whom 10 women accused of harassment, costing Murdoch’s company $45 million to settle lawsuits related to the complaints.

    “There was a problem with our chief executive, sort of, over the year — isolated incidents,” said Murdoch. “As soon as we investigated it, he was out of the place in hours, well, three or four days. And there has been nothing else since then.”

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  5. Peggy Noonan, Roy Moore, And The Impossible Goldilocks Standard For Our Side
    Peggy Noonan, Roy Moore, And The Impossible Goldilocks Standard For Our Side

    Peggy Noonan tells us that "we" -- everybody, not certain people more than others -- have fallen short recently and must do better:

    In 2018, we have to do better, all of us. We need to improve. In the area of politics this means, in part: sober up, think about the long term, be aware of the impression you’re making, of what people will infer from your statements and actions....

    It might help if all public actors, from leaders and investigators to journalists and voters, made a simple vow to make it a little better, not a little worse. The other night a dinner partner marveled at the expensive new fitness monitor he wears on his wrist. I wish there were an Ethical Fitbit that could report at the end of each day that you’d taken 12,304 constructive steps, some uphill, or 3,297 destructive ones, and appropriate action is warranted.

    Yes, she really wrote that. But let's move on.

    Everyone appears to be equally at fault -- with the exception of voters in Alabama:

    There is inspiration in the Alabama outcome.... The headline to me: American political standards made a comeback. Roy Moore’s loss was not a setback for the GOP; it was a setback for freakishness. It was an assertion of prudential judgment by the electorate, and came as a relief.

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