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  1. Maya Rockeymoore Cummings announces run for her late husband's House seat

    Maya Rockeymoore Cummings, the chair of the Maryland Democratic Party and the widow of the late Rep. Elijah Cummings, will run for her husband’s seat

    “I am, of course, devastated at the loss of my spouse, but his spirit is with me,” Rockeymoore Cummings told The Baltimore Sun. “I’m going to run this race and I’m going to run it hard, as if he’s still right here by my side.” Cummings, she said, had wanted her to succeed him, and had even considered stepping down before his death.

    Rockeymoore Cummings is stepping down from leadership of the state party. She had previously been a candidate for governor. She is a policy consultant who has worked as an aide on Capitol Hill. She joins a crowded race—there are already eight Democrats in the special primary election, which will be held February 4. The special general election will be held on April 28, which is the same day as the regular primary, so candidates in the special are signing up for a lot of elections in a short time.

    Rockeymoore Cummings’ public campaign will be delayed by a preventative double mastectomy that will keep her off the campaign trail for up to four weeks.

  2. Daily Kos Elections Live Digest: 11/12

    Welcome to the Daily Kos Elections Live Digest, your liveblog of all of today's campaign news.

    Please note: The Live Digest is a 2016 and 2020 Democratic presidential primary-free space. It’s also a place to discuss elections, not policy.

    Sign up here to receive the Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest in your inbox each weekday.

    Tuesday, Nov 12, 2019 · 4:36:09 PM +00:00 · Jeff Singer

    IL-03: This week, attorney Abe Matthew announced that he was dropping out of the March Democratic primary and endorsing 2018 candidate Marie Newman. Conservative Rep. Dan Lipinski also faces activist Rush Darwish for renomination.

    Tuesday, Nov 12, 2019 · 4:37:55 PM +00:00 · Jeff Singer

    MA-04: While state Rep. Ruth Balser had been mentioned as a possible Democratic candidate for this open seat, she took herself out of the running this week by endorsing Newton City Councilor Becky Walker Grossman.

    Tuesday, Nov 12, 2019 · 4:39:15 PM +00:00 · Jeff Singer

    TX-22: End Citizens United has endorsed 2018 nominee Sri Preston Kulkarni in the March Democratic primary for this open seat.

    Tuesday, Nov 12, 2019 · 4:42:45 PM +00:00 · Jeff Singer

    FL-19: Former Lee County Sheriff Mike Scott and former state Reps. Matt Caldwell and Gary Aubuchon each announced this week that they were endorsing state House Majority Leader Dane Eagle in the GOP primary rather than running themselves. Lee County Commissioner Brian Hamman also confirmed to Florida Politics that he would not seek the GOP nod.

    Tuesday, Nov 12, 2019 · 5:06:00 PM +00:00 · Jeff Singer

    MS-Sen: Former U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy, who was also the state's first black congressman since Reconstruction, announced Tuesday that he’d seek the Democratic nomination for a rematch against GOP Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith. Espy lost last year’s officially nonpartisan special election 54-46 to Hyde-Smith, who had been appointed to the Senate earlier that year. While this was still a clear win for Team Red, it was the worst performance for the Republicans in a Mississippi Senate race since 1988.

    Hyde-Smith and another Republican, state Sen. Chris McDaniel, took a combined 58% of the vote in last November’s nonpartisan primary, and the incumbent probably expected a dull general election contest three weeks later against Espy. However, the runoff quickly attracted the bad kind of national attention when progressive journalist Lamar White posted footage of Hyde-Smith saying of a supporter, "If he invited me to a public hanging, I'd be on the front row."

    Hyde-Smith didn't apologize for showing eagerness to witness a lynching, and Espy ran a commercial going after her over her comments, as well as her "joke" that it should be harder for liberal college students to vote. Several major companies, including Walmart and Major League Baseball, also publicly asked Hyde-Smith to return donations they'd made to her campaign.

    In a familiar scene, national Republicans reportedly became worried about Hyde-Smith's prospects, and the NRSC and Senate Leadership Fund ended up spending a combined $2.8 million here, while Espy's allies at Senate Majority PAC threw down a total of $874,000. Hyde-Smith still won, but her victory didn’t impress anyone.

    It will still be very difficult, though, for Espy to beat Hyde-Smith next year. Mississippi is usually a reliably red state, and while Attorney General Jim Hood came closer to winning the governorship last week than any other Democrat in the 21st Century, he still lost to Republican Tate Reeves 52-47. Hyde-Smith will also be sharing a ballot with Donald Trump, who has already endorsed her re-election bid.

    Tuesday, Nov 12, 2019 · 5:34:30 PM +00:00 · Jeff Singer

    NJ-11: Trucking company executive Jerry Langer recently told the New Jersey Globe that he’s considering seeking the GOP nod to take on freshman Democratic Rep. Mikie Sherrill. Langer added that he would self-fund if he ran, though he didn’t say how much of his own money he’d invest.

    Langer considered running last year to succeed retiring GOP Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen, though he ultimately decided against it. The New Jersey Globe’s David Wildstein wrote at the time that Langer was close to former Gov. Chris Christie, but Wildstein also described him as a "major donor" to Democrat Cory Booker's two Senate bids, as well as to former Democratic Gov. Jim Florio and the DSCC.

    All of that probably won’t go over well with GOP primary voters, but at the moment, they don’t have any other viable options. Morris County Sheriff James Gannon took his name out of the running in February, and while party leaders recently touted him as a potential candidate, Gannon reaffirmed over the weekend he still wouldn’t challenge Sherrill. Wildstein also writes that 2018 candidate Peter DeNeufville “has no plans to run again next year.” DeNeufville invested $1.2 million of his own money last year but lost the primary to Assemblyman Jay Webber 40-30.

    While this affluent suburban seat in North Jersey seat narrowly backed Donald Trump, Sherrill defeated Webber by a wide 57-42 margin. Sherrill was one of Team Blue’s strongest House fundraisers last year, and she’s continued to build up her war chest since she arrived in D.C.: The incumbent raised $710,000 during the third quarter, and she ended September with $1.7 million in the bank.

    Tuesday, Nov 12, 2019 · 5:59:07 PM +00:00 · Jeff Singer

    OR-02: On Tuesday, former state Sen. Jason Atkinson announced that he would seek the GOP nod to succeed retiring Rep. Greg Walden in this safely red seat in eastern Oregon. Atkinson joins state Sen. Cliff Bentz in the May primary.

    Atkinson is the son of Perry Atkinson, who lost the 1998 open seat primary to Walden. The younger Atkinson ran for governor in 2006 and took third in the primary with 22% of the vote, and he planned to run again four years later. However, he was badly injured in 2008 when a friend’s gun accidentally fired and shot him in the leg.

    Atkinson still entered the gubernatorial primary, and he initially looked like the frontrunner. Atkinson barely raised any money, though, and he announced in the fall of 2009 that he was suspending his campaign because both he and his wife had “some serious health concerns.” Atkinson never returned to the race, and he decided not to seek re-election to the legislature in 2012. Atkinson later became a founding member of a high-profile group trying to bring a Major League Baseball team to Portland, though he left it last year.

    Tuesday, Nov 12, 2019 · 5:59:18 PM +00:00 · Stephen Wolf

    MD-07: On Tuesday, Maya Rockeymoore Cummings resigned as state Democratic Party chair and announced she will run in the upcoming special election to fill the seat of her late husband, Rep. Elijah Cummings.

    Rockeymoore Cummings previously mounted a campaign for the Democratic nomination for governor in 2018 but dropped out before the primary due to her husband's poor health. The special election will thus be the first time she'll have been on the ballot, but she has over two decades of experience working in various political and public policy roles, such as serving as chief of staff to former New York Rep. Charlie Rangel and founding a policy consulting firm.

    Previous reports indicated that many Democrats looking at running for this safely Democratic seat would defer to Rockeymoore Cummings, but there's already a primary that includes former Rep. Kweisi Mfume, Del. Talmadge Branch, and pulmonologist Mark Gosnell. Meanwhile, state Sen. Jill Carter has planned a "special announcement" for Monday, and she appears likely to run after having already formed an exploratory committee.

    However, one prominent Democrat won't be running after Howard County Executive Calvin Ball said no to a bid in a disappointment for "Calvin and Hobbes" fans.

    Tuesday, Nov 12, 2019 · 6:29:41 PM +00:00 · Jeff Singer

    VA-05: In some potentially bad news for freshman GOP Rep. Denver Riggleman, the 5th Congressional District Republican Committee voted last week to select their 2020 nominee through a convention rather than through a primary. GOP conventions tend to be dominated by delegates who prize ideology above all else, and Riggleman has made some intra-party enemies during his brief time in office.

    While Riggleman is best known for his intense obsession with Bigfoot, he pissed off plenty of social conservatives at home in July when he officiated a same-sex wedding between two of his former campaign volunteers. This quickly resulted in a homophobic backlash against the congressman, and local Republican Parties in three small 5th District counties each passed anti-Riggleman motions.

    Campbell County Supervisor Bob Good said in late September that he was likely to run, and while it’s not clear if he’s announced he’s in yet, he set up a fundraising committee in early October. Good, who also works as an athletics official at Liberty University, argued earlier this fall that Riggleman betrayed the party "with his votes against the border wall in favor of increased immigration." Good also declared that Riggleman has been "ignoring President Trump's policy on American jobs for American workers, and even restricting the ability of ICE to do their jobs."

    However, one local conservative power player is on Riggleman’s side, and he just happens to be Good’s boss. Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. wrote in his endorsement letter that, while some local GOP leaders were going after Riggleman over the wedding, "I believe that excluding other conservatives over issues that have already been decided by the U.S. Supreme Court does nothing but help liberals gain more power."

    This seat, which includes Charlottesville and south-central Virginia, backed Trump 52-41, and Riggleman defeated a well-funded Democrat 53-47 last year. A few Democrats are already campaigning here.

    Tuesday, Nov 12, 2019 · 6:56:16 PM +00:00 · Stephen Wolf

    NJ-02: Cumberland County Clerk Celeste Riley has ruled out a Democratic primary challenge to Rep. Jeff Van Drew after he was one of just two Democrats to vote against formalizing the impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump. However, some local Democrats are still looking for a more progressive challenger to Van Drew, who is one of the most conservative Democrats in Congress.

    Primarying an incumbent in New Jersey is no easy feat thanks in part to the way the primary ballot is set up. On both sides of the aisle, county party endorsements are typically very important because endorsed candidates appear in a separate column on the ballot along with other party endorsees. Endorsements are therefore a big deal in a state where party machines are still powerful (this designation is known colloquially as the "organization line"), and Van Drew has strong connections to the local party organizations in the 2nd District.

    Tuesday, Nov 12, 2019 · 7:09:03 PM +00:00 · Stephen Wolf

    VA-02: On Monday, Navy veteran Ben Loyola kicked off his campaign, making him the first notable Republican running against first-term Democratic Rep. Elaine Luria. Loyola was born in Cuba and fled the Castro regime with his family as a young child, and after he served as a pilot in the Navy, he founded a company involved in assessing military technology.

    Loyola ran for the predecessor version of this district in 2010 but lost the GOP primary by 40-27 to Scott Rigell, who went on to win the seat that November. He also previously ran for a state Senate seat in 2011 against now-Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam but lost that race 57-43.

    Tuesday, Nov 12, 2019 · 7:19:11 PM +00:00 · Jeff Singer

    AR-02: State Sen. Joyce Elliott, who was the 2010 Democratic nominee for a previous version of this seat, announced just before candidate filing closed on Tuesday that she would challenge GOP Rep. French Hill. If Elliott won, she would be the state’s first black member of Congress.

    This central Arkansas district, which includes the Little Rock area, is the most competitive of the state’s four congressional seats, but it’s still challenging territory for Team Blue. Donald Trump carried the seat 52-42, and Hill turned back a credible challenger 52-46 last year.

    Elliott was serving as state Senate majority leader in 2010 when she campaigned to succeed retiring Democratic Rep. Vic Snyder in a seat that had backed John McCain 54-44. However, Elliott went through an ugly primary against conservative state House Speaker Robbie Wills, who insisted he’d be “more electable” than Elliott and argued she had “extreme views.” Elliott won the nomination 54-46, but she immediately began the general election as the underdog against Republican Tim Griffin. 2010 was an awful year for Democrats all over the country, and Griffin beat Elliott 58-38.

    Elliott didn’t need to give up her seat in the legislature to run for Congress, though, and she still serves in the Senate. Griffin ended up retiring in 2014 after just two terms before successfully running for lieutenant governor, and he was succeeded by Hill.

    Tuesday, Nov 12, 2019 · 7:27:42 PM +00:00 · Jeff Singer

    MS-Sen: Hyde-Smith may need to pay attention to next year’s primary before she can focus on Espy, though. On Monday, former Miss America Organization president Josh Randle set up an exploratory committee for a possible intra-party bid against Hyde-Smith.

  3. Morning Digest: Republicans chase record-setting midterms with 20th House retirement of 2019

    The Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest is compiled by David Nir, Jeff Singer, Stephen Wolf, Carolyn Fiddler, and Matt Booker, with additional contributions from David Jarman, Steve Singiser, Daniel Donner, James Lambert, David Beard, and Arjun Jaikumar.

    Leading Off

    NY-02: On Monday morning, veteran Republican Rep. Peter King announced he would not seek a 15th term next year, opening up yet another vulnerable House seat the GOP will have to scramble to defend.

    Campaign Action

    King's career began in local politics over 40 years ago when he won a seat on the Hempstead Town Council—and the backing of what was then the indomitable Nassau County Republican Party machine, which would play a critical role throughout his tenure in public office. King went on to win a close election to the House in 1992, flipping a seat that Democratic Rep. Robert Mrazek had left open to pursue a bid against GOP Sen. Al D'Amato. (Mrazek's campaign ultimately collapsed as a result of the House banking scandal.)

    During his long tenure, King, 75, only occasionally faced competitive challengers, despite representing a suburban district that Democratic candidates for president usually carried. He accomplished this act of political levitation despite compiling a very conservative record by carving out a reputation as a security-obsessed loudmouth who knew when to vocally break with his party and emphasize his support for local interests.

    Only once did he win re-election by less than double digits: last year, when he held off activist Liuba Grechen Shirley by just a 53-47 spread, despite the fact that Shirley had attracted little outside support from Democrats. That tight result (and perhaps the demise of the Nassau machine) prompted speculation that King might retire, a possibility the congressman did not rule out two months ago, even though he said at the time, "Right now, I fully intend to run for re-election."

    King's change of plans make him the 20th Republican overall to pass on re-election next year, with the pace of GOP retirements almost matching the record-setting 2018 cycle. And as they must in so many other corners of the country,  Republicans will now have to find someone new to hold King's district, which represents fertile territory for Democrats.

  4. Veteran New York Republican quits the House, creating another huge headache for the GOP

    On Monday morning, veteran Republican Rep. Pete King announced he would not seek a 15th term next year, opening up yet another vulnerable House seat the GOP will have to scramble to defend. King's career began in local politics over 40 years ago when he won a seat on the Hempstead Town Council—and the backing of what was then the indomitable Nassau County Republican Party machine, which would play a critical role throughout his tenure in public office. King went on to win a close election to the House in 1992, flipping a seat that Democratic Rep. Robert Mrazek had left open to pursue a bid against GOP Sen. Al D'Amato. (Mrazek's campaign ultimately collapsed as a result of the House banking scandal.)

    During his long tenure, King, 75, only occasionally faced competitive challengers despite representing a suburban district that Democratic candidates for president usually carried. He accomplished this act of political levitation despite compiling a very conservative record by carving out a reputation as a security-obsessed loudmouth who knew when to vocally break with his party and emphasize his support for local interests.

    Only once did he win reelection by less than double digits: last year, when he held off activist Liuba Grechen Shirley by just a 53-47 spread, despite the fact that Shirley had attracted little outside support from Democrats. That tight result (and perhaps the demise of the Nassau machine) prompted speculation that King might retire, a possibility the congressman did not rule out two months ago, even though he said at the time, "Right now, I fully intend to run for re-election."

    Now Republicans will have to find someone new to hold King's district, which represents fertile territory for Democrats. While this seat, which takes in a swath of Long Island's South Shore to the east of New York City, swung to Donald Trump by a 53-44 margin after backing Barack Obama 52-47, it snapped back in the 2018 midterms, giving Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo a 51-47 win. And while educational attainment in New York's 2nd is roughly in the middle of the pack, the district has one of the highest average incomes in the nation, suggesting it could still move further away from the Trump-era GOP.

  5. Daily Kos Elections Live Digest: 11/11

    Welcome to the Daily Kos Elections Live Digest, your liveblog of all of today's campaign news.

    Please note: The Live Digest is a 2016 and 2020 Democratic presidential primary-free space. It’s also a place to discuss elections, not policy.

    Sign up here to receive the Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest in your inbox each weekday.

    Monday, Nov 11, 2019 · 2:26:44 PM +00:00 · David Nir

    x

    New York Rep. Pete King announces retirement https://t.co/ixphD9uDZc

    — NBC Politics (@NBCPolitics) November 11, 2019

    Monday, Nov 11, 2019 · 5:45:10 PM +00:00 · David Nir

    NY-02: On Monday morning, veteran Republican Rep. Pete King announced he would not seek a 15th term next year, opening up yet another vulnerable House seat the GOP will have to scramble to defend.

    King's career began in local politics over 40 years ago when he won a seat on the Hempstead Town Council—and the backing of what was then the indomitable Nassau County Republican Party machine, which would play a critical role throughout his tenure in public office. King went on to win a close election to the House in 1992, flipping a seat that Democratic Rep. Robert Mrazek had left open to pursue a bid against GOP Sen. Al D'Amato. (Mrazek's campaign ultimately collapsed as a result of the House banking scandal.)

    During his long tenure, King, 75, only occasionally faced competitive challengers, despite representing a suburban district that Democratic candidates for president usually carried. He accomplished this act of political levitation despite compiling a very conservative record by carving out a reputation as a security-obsessed loudmouth who knew when to vocally break with his party and emphasize his support for local interests.

    Only once did he win re-election by less than double digits: last year, when he held off activist Liuba Grechen Shirley by just a 53-47 spread, despite the fact that Shirley had attracted little outside support from Democrats. That tight result (and perhaps the demise of the Nassau machine) prompted speculation that King might retire, a possibility the congressman did not rule out two months ago, even though he said at the time, "Right now, I fully intend to run for re-election."

    Now Republicans will have to find someone new to hold King's district, which represents fertile territory for Democrats. While this seat, which takes in a swath of Long Island's South Shore to the east of New York City, swung to Donald Trump by a 53-44 margin after backing Barack Obama 52-47, it snapped back in the 2018 midterms, giving Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo a 51-47 win. And while educational attainment in New York's 2nd is roughly in the middle of the pack, the district has one of the highest average income in the nation, suggesting it could still move further away from the Trump-era GOP.

    The only notable Democrat who'd sought to challenge King this cycle before he announced his departure was Babylon Town Councilor Jackie Gordon, an Afghanistan veteran and Jamaican immigrant, though Shirley had also said in April that she was considering a rematch. Gordon's fundraising has been unspectacular so far, however, and any race for a competitive open seat in the New York media market is bound to get expensive fast.

    Of course, as is often the case when a tough incumbent finally retires, we're likely to see new candidates from the opposing party emerge, and there's also no shortage of Republicans who might run as well. We'll run down all of the potential contenders in the next Digest.

    Monday, Nov 11, 2019 · 6:37:59 PM +00:00 · Matt Booker

    Special Elections: After last week's flurry, there's just one special election on tap for Tuesday.

    AL-HD-74: This is a Republican district based in Montgomery. This vacancy was created after former Rep. Dimitri Polizos died in March. The Democrat is retired state worker Rayford Mack and the Republican is businesswoman Charlotte Meadows. Polizos faced both of these candidates over the course of his career. Mack was the Democratic candidate for this seat last year and fell to Polizos 61-39. Polizos and Meadows ran in the 2013 special primary for this seat and faced each other in a primary runoff, which Polizos won 57-43.

    Alabama is a nightmare from a data standpoint, so we don’t have presidential results from this district. However, there are several indicators of this district’s partisan lean. According to the Montgomery Advertiser, this seat has been in Republican hands since 1983. Additionally,  Meadows has crushed Mack in fundraising to the tune of $34,000 to $4,000.

    Republicans are in control of this chamber 75-28 with this and one other seat vacant.

    Monday, Nov 11, 2019 · 6:39:09 PM +00:00 · Stephen Wolf

    KY-Sen: Kentucky Sports Radio host Matt Jones formed an exploratory committee for the Democratic primary earlier this year, and he reiterated that he was still thinking about running following Democrat Andy Beshear's apparent upset victory over Republican Gov. Matt Bevin last week. Jones revealed that he had made up his mind not to run if Beshear had lost and had planned to "spend a few days thinking about it" if Bevin lost, but now he says he has "more to think about."

    The Kentucky Republican Party certainly seems to be taking Jones seriously, since they recently filed an FEC complaint arguing that Jones was using his radio show and an upcoming book tour to advance his candidacy. In response, Jones’ corporate sponsor, iHeartRadio, took his show off the air, and he called the whole ordeal "classic bully behavior by Mitch McConnell."

    Monday, Nov 11, 2019 · 6:57:22 PM +00:00 · Stephen Wolf

    UT-Gov: Former state House Speaker Greg Hughes hasn't yet jumped into the Republican primary, but he's certainly acting like someone who will run. Hughes' Leadership PAC revealed in a filing that it raised $499,000 this year and had $479,000 in cash-on-hand. Hughes has previously said he expects to decide whether to run in December.

    Monday, Nov 11, 2019 · 7:07:24 PM +00:00 · Stephen Wolf

    LA-Gov: Polling on behalf of several local TV stations, Mason-Dixon finds a tight race ahead of Saturday's runoff. Taken from Nov. 5-7, their poll has Democratic Gov. John Bel Edwards holding a slim 48-46 lead over Republican Eddie Rispone, which is consistent with the few other surveys we've seen here following the all-party primary in October.

    Monday, Nov 11, 2019 · 7:30:49 PM +00:00 · Stephen Wolf

    CA-25: Former Republican Rep. Steve Knight has announced that he'll run to reclaim his old seat in the upcoming special election to replace the Democrat who defeated him last cycle, former Rep. Katie Hill. Knight first won this seat in 2014 and was re-elected in 2016 even as it flipped from 50-48 Romney to 50-44 Clinton, but he lost to Hill by a wide 54.4-45.6 margin in a very expensive contest as 2018's blue wave swept out half of California's Republican delegation.

    While Knight is undoubtedly a heavyweight on the GOP side, he's starting out with only $15,000 left over from his 2018 campaign. Navy veteran Mike Garcia was the best fundraiser on the GOP side in the third quarter, during which he raised $230,000 and finished with $322,000 in cash-on-hand at the start of October. Garcia reaffirmed his commitment to running after Knight kicked off his campaign.

    So far, state Assemblywoman Christy Smith is the only prominent candidate on the Democratic side, and if no one wins a majority in the first round, there would be a runoff between the top-two finishers.

    Monday, Nov 11, 2019 · 7:41:27 PM +00:00 · Stephen Wolf

    KY-Sen: Meanwhile, Democratic state Rep. Charles Booker announced that he is forming an exploratory committee. The 35-year-old Booker was first elected in 2018, becoming the youngest black legislator in 90 years, and he intends to campaign on a progressive platform including the Green New Deal and Medicare for All.

    Monday, Nov 11, 2019 · 7:58:39 PM +00:00 · Stephen Wolf

    FL-19: Lee County Commissioner Cecil Pendergrass is the latest Republican to refuse to rule out a run for this safely red open seat, saying he is not considering the race "at this time." Meanwhile, Florida Politics mentions a few more names who could run that we haven't heard before, including former Lee County Sheriff Mike Scott and former Minnesota state House Minority Whip Dan Severson, who last ran for office in Minnesota in 2014 and lost a very close contest for secretary of state. However, there's no indication yet whether either Republican is interested.

    Monday, Nov 11, 2019 · 8:03:00 PM +00:00 · Stephen Wolf

    IN-01, IN-Gov: Democratic state Sen. Eddie Melton has announced that he'll continue running for governor rather than switch races and run for the open 1st District following Democratic Rep. Pete Visloscky's recent retirement announcement.

    Monday, Nov 11, 2019 · 9:21:44 PM +00:00 · Stephen Wolf

    MD-07: Maryland Democratic Party chair Maya Rockeymoore Cummings plans to make a "special announcement" Tuesday morning, and all signs point to her joining the Democratic primary to replace her late husband, Rep. Elijah Cummings.

    Monday, Nov 11, 2019 · 9:28:14 PM +00:00 · Stephen Wolf

    NJ-03: John Novak, who is the deputy mayor of Barnegat Township (population 21,000) launched his campaign for the Republican nomination last week, but his kickoff generated very little media buzz and it's unclear whether he'll have what it takes to run a strong race. Meanwhile, former Burlington County Freeholder Kate Gibbs formed an exploratory committee back in September, and National Journal's Alex Clearfield reports that an unnamed source said she'll make her GOP primary campaign official sometime before Thanksgiving.

    Monday, Nov 11, 2019 · 9:48:33 PM +00:00 · Stephen Wolf

    NJ-05: Paul Duggan is the latest Republican to join the primary to take on Democratic Rep. Josh Gottheimer. Duggan ran for last year's Bergen County executive position and lost the GOP primary by just 50.3-49.7 to Bergenfield Mayor, who went on to lose the general election to Democratic incumbent James Tedesco by a 63-37 drubbing. Duggan's past electoral experience wasn't any more successful, including close defeats for a 2017 state Assembly primary and a 2007 general election for the Bergen County Board of Freeholders. He joins a GOP primary that includes 2018 nominee John McCann, former Wall Street banker Frank Pallotta, and Montvale Mayor Mike Ghassali.

    Monday, Nov 11, 2019 · 9:57:02 PM +00:00 · Stephen Wolf

    TX-13: According to Roll Call, former White House chief physician Ronny Jackson is reportedly considering a run for the Republican nomination in this dark-red district. Jackson was Trump's personal physician until a botched nomination to lead the Department of Veterans Affairs last year, which saw Jackson withdraw from consideration after whistleblowers accused him of excessively drinking while on the job and overprescribing medications. Jackson has denied those charges, and Roll Call reports that he's still "well-liked by Trump," meaning it's possible he could capitalize on those ties if he ends up running for this open seat.

    Monday, Nov 11, 2019 · 10:27:34 PM +00:00 · Stephen Wolf

    San Francisco, CA District Attorney: In a victory for the criminal justice reform movement, public defender Chesa Boudin has defeated appointed incumbent Suzy Loftus to become San Francisco's next district attorney. In the first round of instant-runoff voting, Boudin held a 36-31 lead over Loftus, with former San Francisco prosecutor Nancy Tung taking 19% and deputy state attorney general Leif Dautch taking 14%. After Dautch and Tung were eliminated, their voters who expressed a preference between Boudin and Loftus put Boudin over the top by a slim 51-49 margin.

    Boudin had the support of a number of prominent national criminal justice reformers, including Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner, while Loftus was supported by San Francisco Mayor London Breed, Gov. Gavin Newsom, and Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Kamala Harris. Both had called have called for overhauling the local justice system, but Boudin's platform advocated for the biggest departure from the status quo.

    Boudin also has an unusual background that helped shape his views: Both of his parents were members of the militant far-left Weather Underground and went to prison when he was just 14 months old for their role as getaway drivers in the notorious Brink’s armored car robbery that ended in the deaths of two police officers and a security guard north of New York City in 1981. He's vowed to pursue policies such as ending cash bail and measures to address racial bias and to hold the police accountable in misconduct cases.